Wednesday, July 15, 2015


Dr Gislason wrote: "Selfcare only works if you have adequate knowledge and effective problem solving strategies. In the best case, you would know enough about your body functions to interpret symptoms as they arise and you would take corrective action. You would develop a good sense of what problems you can manage yourself and you would know when to seek help. You would use all the preventive strategies available to you and would use screening tests to detect early stages of disease. I have written several books on specific diseases with the idea of presenting adequate knowledge and suggesting problem solving strategies."

The Alpha Nutrition Program is a rational plan that requires new learning, discipline and self-control.  A basic intention is to do a better job of self-regulating. Self-regulation implies control over behavior. I learned by watching a few thousand people attempt to do this program that people with some measure of self-control were uncommon. I learned that self-discipline was in short supply and that rational plans tended to fail without a lot of support. Since eating is a social activity, changes in eating habits require a social method. 

Some exceptional people live well-organized lives with traditional lifestyle eating habits and operate from an internal locus of control that gives them an enviable ability to self-manage. If you have a well-developed center, you have an easier time developing new patterns, once you accept that it is necessary and desirable to change. You can plan an orderly transition from old to new. People with a strong internal locus of control are more skilled at collecting and evaluating information. They accept professional advice as information, not as parental authority. They tend to feel more confident making their own decisions."

Interface with MDs

For many years, we have proposed a collaborative relationship between patient and physician. The growth of medical information in the internet gives every intelligent person access to current information and to a variety of options. Often a patient with a specific disease is better informed than the physician. Carolyn Clancy, director of the US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality stated: Patients are becoming more involved in decisions about their care. Even though this is a major change to how we (MDs) practice medicine, it will, over time, create a genuine partnership between doctors and patients. We recognize the importance of clear, ongoing communication, including questioning why a particular treatment decision was made. We need to engage our patients in the same way. My agency has developed a new public awareness campaign with the Ad Council to encourage patients to take a more active role in their healthcare.

A Free Copy of the book Self Care for the 21st Century is available as a PDF file for download.