Friday, August 05, 2016

Bad Chemicals= Social Chaos

Common effects of erratic brain function are conflict and chaos. Two people living together with erratic brain function increase chaos by more than a factor of two. More people interacting erratically increase chaos exponentially until family structures, community structures, and national structures become dysfunctional.

Bad chemicals entering human brains from polluted air and water, wrong foods, alcoholic beverages, legal and illegal drugs is a recipe for a society's dysphoric disintegration. We might better appreciate the folly of "fighting a drug war" when we realize that most chemical demons live at home. Unfortunately, in terms of substances that can impair brain function, drug sellers include every corner store, fast food outlet, pop vendor, pharmacy and supermarket. Local bars and liquor outlets generate a continuous stream of social and health problems at an enormous cost to society.

We must be smart enough to see the connections among food materials which influence brain function: alcoholic beverages, nicotine in tobacco, teas, coffee, chocolate, spices, food additives, sugar excess, wheat, milk, eggs, prescription drugs and street drugs. We should be very concerned about the prescription drug problem with drug addiction and dependency that is supported by all our institutions. Unfortunately, the practice of medicine has become a drug-pushing affair. An addicted society will better tolerate the social pathology and diseases caused by tobacco smoke, alcoholic beverages, air pollution, bad food, sedatives, antidepressants, tranquilizers, and sleeping pills but displaces its dysphoric energy in a "drug war" against cocaine, heroin and a few other "drugs of abuse".

Humans are seldom consistent in setting goals and priorities so that societal confusion about the use and abuse of food chemicals and drugs is more or less predictable. Smart policy makers will, however, understand that most citizens are under the influence of one mid-altering drug or another. The daily use and abuse of several brain chemicals produces mentally disabled people who are neither reasonable nor correct in their thinking and conduct. When physicians intervene and prescribe more chemicals, they add to the chaotic mix, not realizing there is there is little hope of benefit. To my way of thinking, this drug psychotherapy has become a perverse enterprise with no happy endings in sight.

From the Human Brain by Stephen Gislason MD

Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Immune Cells

The role of immune networks is to defend the body against foreign invasion. Microbes such as bacteria invade the body and activate innate antibacterial systems, such as the complement cascade. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes are attracted to this activity and attempt to ingest the bacteria.

The surfaces of the body are protected by cells on duty much like a military organization defends a country. The interior body surfaces are lined with a moist mucous-secreting surface that senses and reacts to the ambient environment. Antigens are protein molecules that are recognized by immune cells. Any chemical can link to a protein and become an antigen. Immune sensors or lymphoid tissues are present in the surface linings or mucosa of the intestine and respiratory tract (MALT).

These sensors are mast cells, macrophages and mobile lymphocytes of both T and B varieties. B and T-helper lymphocytes can only see antigen presented by macrophages and other antigen-presenting cells (APC).

The purpose of the surveillance is to detect and respond to foreign antigens. In the gut, lymphocytes are also contained in follicles, the solitary lymphoid nodules (SLN), found along the length of the intestine and in much of the upper and lower respiratory tracts. SLNs sample the soluble and particulate matter from the environment. The gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) and the lung or bronchus-associated lymphoid tissues (BALT) are sensing agents for the whole body, identifying antigens for later detection by internal immune defenses. Both GALT and BALT and SLNs, contain predominantly B cells in which the major immunoglobulin classes synthesized are IgM and IgA.

Antigen Presenting Cells

Immune responses often begin with macrophages, dendritic cells and other antigen-presenting cells (APC) that ingest process and then present antigens on their surface. The antigen signal attracts other immune cells who recognize it and are activated by it. Antigen is presented adjacent to the major histocompatability complex (MHC) proteins on the surface of APCs. The details of how APCs ingest, digest and then express foreign antigens are being worked out. The antigen moves through the cell membrane and is incorporated into a phagosome which interacts with acts endoplasmic reticulum, a protein transfer system that moves the antigen via a transporter to a location in the cell where the antigen binds to MHC class I molecules. The antigen-MCH complex is then moved thorough the cell membrane to appear on the outside as a receptor.

Molecules on bacterial membranes activate toll-like receptors (TLRs) on macrophages and dendritic cells. These cells respond by secreting proinflammatory cytokines as well as proteins such as CD86 and CD40 that activate other cells amplifying the original signals and exciting an inflammatory cascade. Dendritic cells (DCs) discover antigens in peripheral tissues and then migrate to the local lymph nodes, where they encounter CD4+ or CD8+ T cells, which are activated by the presentation of antigen-derived peptides in association with major histocompatibility complex (MHC).

DCs take up antigen through different receptor families, such as Fc receptors for antigen-antibody complexes, C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) for glycoproteins, and pattern recognition receptors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs), for microbial antigens. Geijtenbeek et al suggested that:” DCs are continuously sampling and presenting self- and harmless environmental proteins to silence immune activation. Uptake of self-components in the intestine and airways are good examples of sites where continuous presentation of self- and foreign antigens occurs without immune activation. In contrast, efficient antigen-specific immune activation occurs upon encounter of DCs with nonself-pathogens. Recognition of pathogens by DCs triggers specific receptors such as TLRs that result in DC maturation and subsequently immune activation. Here we discuss the concept that cross talk between TLRs and CLRs, differentially expressed by subsets of DCs, accounts for the different pathways to peripheral tolerance, such as deletion and suppression, and immune activation.”

Monocytes are circulating macrophages that can enter tissue spaces and promote inflammation. Macrophages are found within the endothelium generally and are concentrated in the lung, liver and spleen where they remove antigen and immune complexes from the blood.

Some tissues have resident macrophages such as the Langerhan's cells in the skin. Killer T-cells recognize antigen presented on MHC class I on all types of somatic cells. The purpose of the surveillance is to detect, and respond to foreign antigens. Since most antigens are proteins and foreign proteins arrive daily in the food ingested, I am interested in the mechanisms by which food proteins activate immune cells and cause disease.

APCs can ingest foreign protein and process them into peptides in proteasomes. Peptides are then transported into the endoplasmic reticulum to MHC class I molecules for presentation. Houde et al, for example, showed that latex beads labelled with fluorescent ovalbumin (egg white protein) were ingested and fluorescence could be detected in the cytoplasm, indicating that proteins are moved from outside into the cyoplasm for degradation by proteasomes. They showed that phagosomes are a site of loading onto MHC class I molecules on the cell surface, leading to T-cell stimulation.


Two major groups of lymphocytes are recognized as Thymus dependent or T-lymphocytes; and Bursa dependent or B-lymphocytes. Adaptive immune responses require B cells to provide antibody and T cells to provide cell-mediated immunity. Cell surface receptors recognize antigens. B-lymphocytes learn make antibodies to specific antigens. Although T and B cells share a common progenitor, their development occurs in different locations in the body. B cells develop in the bone marrow and mature in lymphoid tissue. T lymphocyte progenitors leave the bone narrow and travel to the thymus where they mature.
The identity of a foreign molecule, microorganism or cell, is recognized by an antigenic determinant, an amino acid sequence, usually contained in an intact protein. Once an antigenic determinant is recognized, its sequence is remembered by clones of antigen-specific B and T-memory cells which can activate other B lymphocytes that make antibodies against the antigen. T memory cells are also referred to a as helper T cells which are activated by the binding of a specific antigen encountered in the past, a signal that initiates defense against familiar pathogens.

One of the growing complexities in immunology is the description of cell surface receptors for a growing list of cytokines. Research reports are dense with acronyms, abbreviations and codes that may deter even an experienced reader. Some of these markers are described as CD followed by a number; CD122, for example is a receptor for interleukin 2- . In addition some descriptions emphasize the presence or absence of a well-studied receptor; CD122 + or -. CD receptors may be associated with other surface molecules in complexes. For example, natural killer T lymphocytes (NKT) have CD94-NKG2 complexes that bind to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class Ib, aka Qa-1, on the surface of antigen presenting cells. CD8+ suppressor T cells regulate peripheral immune responses.
The frequencies of blood lymphocyte subsets are monitored by flow cytometry using monoclonal antibodies to identify subtypes: for example, OKT4 identifies CD4+, T-helper cells and OKT8 identifies CD8+, T-suppressor cells.

Virus-specific CD8 and CD4 T lymphocytes play an important role in controlling HIV replication; however CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes are infected by HIV virus. Identifying and counting CD4 cells is a major tool in following patients with AIDs taking antiretroviral medications.

See Immunology Notes at Alpha Online

Thursday, July 21, 2016

Food Allergy

The problem is not that 25% of people recognize symptoms from food ingestion, but that many more people do not recognize that food is making them ill. We hope the reader will take the time to find out why we think food allergy is such an important mechanism of disease and how to resolve common food-related health problems by diet revision. Food allergy, as a topic in medicine, has been suppressed for many years and is not taught in medical schools. Too many vested interests have much to lose if more people discovered that popular foods were making them ill. Commonly quoted "expert" opinions tend to minimize the incidence and importance of food allergy. While the dogma is misleading, it represents vested interests and is remarkably persistent.

The conviction that food allergy is a ubiquitous cause of disease comes from knowing the benefits of careful diet revision in medical practice. In response to allergy lobby groups in the USA, the US Congress passed a bill that requires notice on the labels of foodstuffs that contain eight of the most common food allergens. The Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act, will require plain English labeling beginning in 2006 of products containing wheat, milk, soy, peanuts, tree nuts, fish, shellfish, or eggs. The bill also requires the Food and Drug Administration to develop a definition of the term "gluten-free" to help those with celiac disease and who require a gluten free diet for other reasons.

The concept of immune responses to food antigens is useful in understanding many diseases. Many of the major unsolved disease of our civilization are either degenerative and/or inflammatory and many are recognized to be inflammatory, immune-mediated, hypersensitivity diseases. In this book, a general theory of hypersensitivity disease as a continuum of disease-causing mechanisms is presented. The term "hypersensitivity" refers to immune-mediated processes that lead to disease. As we consider the possible role of food antigens in causing or contributing to immune-mediated diseases, we look for opportunities to help patients with simple and safe therapeutic strategies such as diet revision. The basic phenomena that concern us are:
  • Food antigens activate immune networks.
  • Activated immune networks produce symptoms
  • Long-term activation of immune networks causes chronic disease, with inflammation in target organs.
  • The food supply is the most abundant and continuous source of antigenic material.

Different types of food allergy

1. The immediate or type 1 food allergy pattern is easily recognized because it involves quick and dramatic symptoms. Hay fever is the most common type 1 allergy and can be diagnosed by allergy skin tests. Some food allergy is also type 1 and shows up on skin tests.

2. Delayed patterns of food allergy are not so obvious and generally go unrecognized. Allergy skin tests do not show this problem nor do IgE antibody tests. Symptom onset is delayed many hours after eating foods and chronic disease is often the result. Rheumatic diseases, autoimmune diseases, multiple sclerosis, insulin-dependent diabetes, thyroiditis, psoriasis are examples of hypersensitivity diseases that involve humoral and cell-mediated immunity. The common specific problems that are related to food allergy include asthma, rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, urticaria, anaphylaxis, angioedema, allergic gastroenteropathy, and allergic arthritis.

Many patients will express several of these hypersensitivity phenomena over a lifetime and demonstrate an underlying tendency to be hypersensitive. An important concern is the possibility that the chemical soup created by our civilization drives increasing numbers of individuals into hypersensitivity illness. The advocates of a broad definition of food allergy run the risk of being evangelical.

At Alpha Nutrition, a major commitment is to educate people about delayed patterns of food allergy and to point to opportunities people have to resolve serious illness on their own. Our strategies of self-management are simple and straight forward, but require knowledge, perspective and self control. We are the first to acknowledge that some people lack these prerequisites and our information will not help them.

Dr. Gislason stated: "I began to learn about food allergy in 1981 when I first developed inflammatory arthritis. I discovered a simple truth that eating a few safe foods resolved my illness and returning to my previously normal diet recreated the illness that was so severe, I could not work or enjoy life. I thought that my medical colleagues would be as excited as I was to discover that such a serious illness could be cured with diet revision. I did encounter the occasional MD who shared my enthusiasm for further research but most MDs were hostile to the science of food allergy, even when the therapies they offered patients were ineffective and even harmful. I have learned a lot about the politics of medicine and the strategies used by corporations to control the market place. Corporate control has advanced remarkably since I began my quest to understand the mechanisms of food allergy and to teach self-management solutions. Drug companies own medical practice and compete for their market share with skill, determination and huge promotional budgets. They do not want people to solve health problems on their own. They want people to depend on MDs and buy dru
gs "

Learn More About Food Allergy at Alpha Online

Inflammation in Vascular Disease

The mechanisms of arterial disease appear to be multiple. Hollander of Boston University suggested that atherosclerosis was an autoimmune disorder with immune complexes injuring blood vessel walls. We think that circulating immune complexes often contain food proteins as antigens and this mechanism is important in causing a wide spectrum of food allergic disease. Since proteins derived from meat, milk, eggs and wheat have the highest risk of appearing in the blood as immune complexes, these foods are reduced or eliminated in the Alpha Nutrition Program.
We ask a simple question - If there is any possibility that chronic symptoms such as attacks of migraine, heart rhythm abnormalities, digestive disturbances, breathing difficulties or brain dysfunction are linked to food ingestion, would it not be prudent to investigate and remove food -causes using diet revision as an inexpensive, safe, effective strategy?

Keaney et al reported that:” background Inflammation within vulnerable coronary plaques may cause unstable angina by promoting rupture and erosion. In unstable angina, activated leukocytes may be found in peripheral and coronary-sinus blood. “

A non-specific indicator of inflammation is the C-reactive protein levels in the blood. Elevated levels are associated with increased risk of heart attacks and strokes. For example, Ridker et al studied 27,939 apparently healthy American women, who were followed for eight years for the occurrence of myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, coronary revascularization, or death from cardiovascular causes. Elevated C-reactive protein levels were a better predictor of vascular events than low LDL cholesterol levels. The researchers reported that: ” 77 percent of all events occurred among women with LDL cholesterol levels below 160 mg per deciliter (4.14 mmol per liter), and 46 percent occurred among those with LDL cholesterol levels below 130 mg per deciliter (3.36 mmol per liter)… C-reactive protein and LDL cholesterol measurements tended to identify different high-risk groups, screening for both biologic markers provided better prognostic information than screening for either alone.”

Myeloperoxidase is another serum marker of inflammation that may be informative.  Myeloperoxidase is an enzyme that generates reactive oxygen species, is released from white blood cells. In one study, plasma myeloperoxidase levels were predictive of subsequent coronary events in patients with chest pain. Myeloperoxidase levels, in contrast to troponin T, creatine kinase MB isoform, and C-reactive protein levels, identified patients at risk for cardiac events in the absence of myocardial necrosis.“

Inflammation can be treated by removing the causes of inflammation, treating infection and using anti-inflammatory medication such as ASA and  Statins. The role of food proteins and immune complexes as agents of inflammation is rarely investigated and may turn out to be the hidden agent behind many heart attacks and strokes. Several studies are investigating a variety of immune-modulating therapies to prevent heart attacks and strokes.

See Arterial Disease at Alpha Online


Obscurity to Big Pharma

Fibromyalgia and the chronic fatigue syndrome have evolved from relative obscurity to become a brand name for a bizarre assortment of products and services. Drugs are prescribed by physicians in a haphazard manner as if they were browsing through the pharmacy shelf picking out drugs at random. A variety of pain relief clinics offer another random assortment of services. A variety of imaginative explanations is offered with little evidence. Sick lifestyles and environment problems are generally ignored. Drug prescriptions include pain relievers, muscle relaxants, antidepressants, anti-anxiety drugs, sleeping pills and anticonvulsants.

WebMD in 2016 offered this  perspective:” Your fibromyalgia specialist may prescribe pain medication or antidepressants to help treat the pain, fatigue, depression, and anxiety that comes with the disease. In addition, your doctor may recommend physical therapy, moist heat, regular aerobic exercise, relaxation, and stress reduction to help you self-manage your symptoms. There is no one "pill" that treats or cures fibromyalgia. A multidisciplinary approach that uses both medication and alternative or lifestyle strategies seems to work best to treat fibromyalgia symptoms.”

Lyrica and Other Useless Drugs

Big Pharma has moved the marketing of Fibromyalgia into big-money TV advertising. The US FDA approved the drug, Lyrica (Pregabalin), for fibromyalgia and TV ads show happy patients enjoying a pain-free life.  This is  a serious anticonvulsant drug with alarming negative effects including suicide. Lyrica can cause life-threatening, allergic reactions.  Symptoms of an allergic reaction include swelling of the face, mouth, lips, gums, tongue, throat or neck. Lyrica may cause depression, anxiety, restlessness, trouble sleeping, panic attacks, anger, irritability, agitation, aggression, dangerous impulses or violence, or extreme increases in activity or talking.  

Our questions are why would any physician prescribe and why would any patient take this potentially dangerous drug?? 

Our view is that the Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) , Fibromyalgia and related disorders are not discrete diseases in the usual sense, but patterns of maladaptive responses to food and the environment. We believe that chronic fatigue syndrome is an expression of non-specific hypersensitivity disease and should be treated with diet revision as the first and most essential form of therapy. 

The Alpha Nutrition Program is designed to improve fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue and related disorders. The most definitive clearing program is a food holiday, using an elemental nutrient formula (Alpha ENF), composed of nutrients in their pure form with no other food intake. Alpha ENF allows a sick person to return to a baseline of normal functioning, without the intake of numerous adverse substances that may have been present in their food supply.


Sunday, October 18, 2015

Diesel Exhaust Causes Disease

The Combustion Process

Gasoline and diesel fuels are mixtures of hydrocarbons (made of hydrogen, oxygen and carbon atoms.) Hydrocarbons are burned by combining with oxygen. Nitrogen and sulphur atoms are also present and combine with oxygen when burned to produce gases. Attempts to reduce exhaust emissions from gasoline and diesel engines have been compromised by limitations of testing, inherent flaws in the design and inadequate maintenance of emission control devices.

Diesel engines a pose different emission control problems than gasoline engines. Diesels require more sophisticated and expensive components than the catalytic converters fitted to gasoline engines. Diesel emissions contain nitrogen oxide gases and carbon particles, the smallest of which contribute to lung and heart disease. Increases in airborne fine particulate matter increases the risk for myocardial infarctions, strokes and heart failure. Particle deposition in the lungs activates the sympathetic nervous system and triggers the release of systemic pro-inflammatory responses.

Brook and Rajagopalanb stated: "Higher circulating levels of inflammatory cytokines cause vascular endothelial dysfunction and activation of vasoconstrictive pathways while blunting vasodilator capacity. At the molecular level, the generation of oxidative stress with the consequent up-regulation of redox sensitive pathways appears to be a common mechanism of these pro-hypertensive responses. Due to the ubiquitous, continuous and often involuntary nature of exposure, airborne fine particles may be an important and under-appreciated worldwide environmental risk factor for increased arterial BP.

In Sept. 2015 a scandal erupted when Volkswagen, the world's largest car manufacturer, was caught cheating on emission tests of their diesel engines. In testing lab conditions, VW could show conformity with emission standards fro nitrogen oxides. Subsequent independent testing of VW diesel vehicles in road tests revealed high levels of nitrogen oxides emitted in real operating conditions. Errors in media reports proliferated with talk of defeat devices and software that would fool emission tests.

Relevant engineering data was not readily available but likely the cause of the problem was the Nitrogen Oxide converter (aka NOx storage catalytic converter ) that required injections of unburned fuel to keep the converter clean and functional. The exhaust output was supposed be free of nitrogen oxides. The computer that controlled fuel injection was programmed to inject more fuel than was needed for combustion for about 2 seconds per minute. The fuel reaching the converter would burn increasing the temperature in the converter. Burning the diesel fuel in the converter would likely increase the emission of other air pollutants. The software functioned optimally for emissions testing and was turned off when the engine was in service. The NO converter was a poor design that would increase fuel consumption and decrease engine performance if the converter was operated for full emissions control.

Jack Baruth advocated the end of diesel cars and pickup trucks. He stated: "Western democracies encouraged diesel even though they were perfectly aware of the health hazards posed by diesel particulate exhaust. Those risks are far better documented than even the most "settled" climate science, and they are very real. Eurocrats chose diesel in order to be seen to be doing something about global warming, and the manufacturers had to abide by their choice. The result? Paris has had to ban cars for hours or even days at a time because of smog. According to The Guardian, "diesel-related health problems cost (the British National Health Service) more than 10 times as much as comparable problems caused by petrol fumes. Last year the UN's World Health Organization declared that diesel exhaust caused cancer and was comparable in its effects to secondary cigarette smoking. And that was when people thought that these diesels were meeting pollution standards! Now, of course, we know that many of them were not, and that even the diesel cars that weren't designed to cheat the tests are not performing in the real world the way they do in the test labs. In other words, diesel-powered automobiles are killing people, and in not inconsiderable numbers. The jury is in and the evidence is clear." (Jack Baruth. Road & Track. Oct 2015)

A review in the Science journal, Nature, questioned the relationships between auto manufacturers and regulatory bodies: "Among the questions raised by the scandal that allowed the German car maker Volkswagen to sell 11 million vehicles containing software that cheats emissions tests, many will ask why the regulators failed to notice and halt the practice. The answer is not complicated. Regulated industries exert massive, discreet pressure on regulators such as the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), to stop them doing their jobs properly."

To put the VW scam in perspective,  the big problems were corporate cheating and deliberate violation of public trust. It appears that this deception will cost VW several billion euros and is an embarrassment for all of Germany. Regulatory agencies have been alerted to their limitations and will be changing testing procedures for all new engines that include monitoring emissions during real driving tests in real driving conditions.

See Air and Breathing by Stephen Gislason MD

Sunday, August 23, 2015

Blood Circulation to the Brain

The brain is a unique organ in the body. The blood circulation in the brain is more complex, more regulated, and less understood than the circulation in any other tissue. The large arteries carrying blood to the brain are the internal carotids and the vertebral arteries. The condition of these arteries determines how much blood flow is available to the brain. The smaller cerebral (pial) arteries respond to changing demands from blood supply from cerebral tissues. This auto regulation tries to maintain stable cerebral blood flow even with unstable cerebral perfusion pressure. Brain circulation responds in complex ways to a large number of stimuli. Failure of autoregulation may be one of the most common sources of brain dysfunction especially in people with high blood pressure on medications.

Brain activity regulates brain circulation by controlling cardiac output and blood pressure. Emotions, especially anger, are strong events that act on the cardiovascular system; heart rate increases and blood pressure rises, often dramatically. Cognitive tasks increase blood flow and metabolic rate in the regions of the brain that process the task. Changes in localized blood flow are the basis of functional imaging studies that reveal the modules in the brain that are active during task processing.

Blood-brain barrier

Cerebral microvessels have a unique feature, the blood-brain barrier, which protects sensitive brain cells from disturbing elements circulating in the blood. Endothelial cells line blood vessel. Their behavior regulates permeability. In the brain, tight intercellular junctions limit endothelial permeability. A variety of chemical signals to and from endothelia cells control blood vessel transactions with glial cells and neurons. Cerebral vessels have nerves supplies -sympathetic, parasympathetic, and sensory nerve fibers. Gaseous transmitters such as nitric oxide (NO) dilate small blood vessels and participate in the regulation of blood flow.

Syncope (fainting) is an expression of reduced cerebral blood flow. Prolonged standing, emotional arousal, blood pressure drugs, cardiac arrhythmias, and autonomic nervous system failure are common causes of syncope. Blood tends to pool in the legs with prolonged standing. Muscle activity is required to pump venous blood uphill back to the heart. With reduced venous return, cardiac output drops and humans faint. A common symptom, the feeling of lightheadedness is an expression of reduced blood flow to the brain. Since cerebral arterial disease increases with age, decreasing symptoms of limited blood flow become more common such as lightheadedness, fainting, personality changes and deteriorating cognitive ability.

Some of the disturbances will be regional with selectively compromised functions. Other disturbances will be global. The use of medications to reduce blood pressure may have adverse effects because lowering blood pressure can decrease cerebral perfusion in patients with chronic vascular brain pathology; they may develop focal hypoxia and even ischemia in poorly perfused regions of their brain.

Stroke is the leading cause of disability in the U.S. and Canada

Stroke is the leading cause of permanent disability in the U.S. and Canada, second leading cause of dementia and the third leading cause of adult death. Stroke is the third leading cause of death and a major source of disability in the US where 700,000 people have a stroke and 158,000 die from stroke. From 1993 to 2003, the stroke death rate fell 18.5%, but the actual number of stroke deaths declined only 0.7%, according to 2006 statistics.

The main event of a heart attack is the occlusion by a sudden blood clot of one or more blood vessels supplying the heart muscle. A similar occlusion of blood vessels supplying the brain will result in the death of brain tissue or cerebral infarction. Another cause of stroke is hemorrhage from a ruptured blood vessel. Yet another stroke mechanism is the occlusion of a brain artery by a clot that traveled to the brain from another body location, usually the heart; embolism is most likely to occur in people with atrial fibrillation and mechanical heart valves.

Neurologists say doctors and the public should give stroke victims the same urgent treatment given to heart attack victims. The clot-dissolving drug TPA (tissue plasminogen activator), when used in the first three hours after a stroke, can restore blood flow in the brains of some patients. Some hospitals have better tools for dealing with strokes, but require the stroke patient to seek treatment quickly. The message in the media is to act fast on the warning signs of a stroke - stokes are now described as "brain attacks" to encourage the same sense of urgency attributed to heart attacks. Symptoms include weakness or numbness, especially on one side of the body; blurred vision, usually in one eye; slurred speech; dizziness; and explosive headache.

The hope for dramatic rescue of stroke victims with TPA is somewhat tarnished by the impractical requirement of getting the right treatment right away. One major problem is that some strokes are caused by bleeding into the brain and TPA would make this worse. Before getting TPA, patients must be checked to ensure they are not bleeding in the brain. If you were planning to have a stroke, you have to set up an ideal circumstance in order to be rescued. You would have to recognize that you were having a stroke almost immediately; you would have to get to a well-equipped hospital promptly; the emergency room would have to be set up to make the diagnosis promptly, get a high quality CAT scan done and interpreted by an expert and then you would have to satisfy several criteria for treatment - the first is that the CAT scan shows that there is no bleeding associated with the stroke symptoms.

Preventing Strokes

We share the conviction with a growing number of experts in the field that simple, safe home remedies especially diet revision and exercise can substantially reduce this destructive disease and save untold suffering and billions of health-care dollars. Smoking must stop. Diabetes, high blood pressure, and high blood cholesterol must be controlled to prevent stroke and, again, diet revision with weight loss and increased daily exercise can work wonders. Drugs are only required if risk factors are not controlled by changes in diet and lifestyle.

Well-known risk factors are

  • high blood pressure
  • smoking
  • high alcohol intake
  • diabetes
  • excess body fat
  • physical inactivity.

Stroke Prevention

  • Diet Revision -- Alpha Nutrition Program
  • Exercise and Weight Loss
  • Reduce blood pressure
See The Human Brain is Health and Disease by Stephen Gislason MD

Wednesday, July 15, 2015


Dr Gislason wrote: "Selfcare only works if you have adequate knowledge and effective problem solving strategies. In the best case, you would know enough about your body functions to interpret symptoms as they arise and you would take corrective action. You would develop a good sense of what problems you can manage yourself and you would know when to seek help. You would use all the preventive strategies available to you and would use screening tests to detect early stages of disease. I have written several books on specific diseases with the idea of presenting adequate knowledge and suggesting problem solving strategies."

The Alpha Nutrition Program is a rational plan that requires new learning, discipline and self-control.  A basic intention is to do a better job of self-regulating. Self-regulation implies control over behavior. I learned by watching a few thousand people attempt to do this program that people with some measure of self-control were uncommon. I learned that self-discipline was in short supply and that rational plans tended to fail without a lot of support. Since eating is a social activity, changes in eating habits require a social method. 

Some exceptional people live well-organized lives with traditional lifestyle eating habits and operate from an internal locus of control that gives them an enviable ability to self-manage. If you have a well-developed center, you have an easier time developing new patterns, once you accept that it is necessary and desirable to change. You can plan an orderly transition from old to new. People with a strong internal locus of control are more skilled at collecting and evaluating information. They accept professional advice as information, not as parental authority. They tend to feel more confident making their own decisions."

Interface with MDs

For many years, we have proposed a collaborative relationship between patient and physician. The growth of medical information in the internet gives every intelligent person access to current information and to a variety of options. Often a patient with a specific disease is better informed than the physician. Carolyn Clancy, director of the US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality stated: Patients are becoming more involved in decisions about their care. Even though this is a major change to how we (MDs) practice medicine, it will, over time, create a genuine partnership between doctors and patients. We recognize the importance of clear, ongoing communication, including questioning why a particular treatment decision was made. We need to engage our patients in the same way. My agency has developed a new public awareness campaign with the Ad Council to encourage patients to take a more active role in their healthcare.

A Free Copy of the book Self Care for the 21st Century is available as a PDF file for download.

Tuesday, July 14, 2015

Narcotic Drugs Addiction and Death

Narcotic drugs have always been associated with addiction; however, narcotic drugs remain the best agents to relieve pain. Pain management is the reason people are most likely to seek medical attention. Physicians try to balance their desire to elevate suffering against concerns that the patient in pain just wants a drug prescription. Physicians remain constrained by problems of drug dependence and addiction and are reluctant to prescribe narcotics or prescribe weak, inferior narcotics such as codeine and demerol. 
Weintstein et al polled 386 physicians in Texas and found that a significant number of physicians had prejudice against the use of opioid analgesics, displayed lack of knowledge about pain and its treatment, and had negative views about patients with chronic pain. They suggested that new educational strategies are needed to improve pain treatment in medical practice.  
 The narcotics that are considered to have the greatest addiction potential include codeine 60 mg, oxycodone, methadone, hydromorphone, demerol (meperidine), fentanyl, and morphine. The World Health Organization (WHO) suggested a progressive treatment of pain. For mild pain: aspirin, acetaminophen, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and adjuvants. For moderate pain: mild opioids. For severe pain: traditional opioids. Physician concerns are justified. Narcotic-dependent people routinely solicit prescriptions from a number of physicians and become good at feigning painful conditions. Every primary care physician will have patients who tend to demand prescriptions for pain relievers and other psychotropic drugs and will become chronic users, unless the physician steadfastly resists their demands and limits prescriptions to short term use. 

Prescribed narcotics are always available for sale on the street. Most originate with doctors who are lenient prescribers. Drug traffickers have lists of lenient Doctors who write narcotic prescriptions on demand for a fee.  Prescribed narcotics are always available for sale on the street. For example, about two million Americans have admitted taking OxyContin (oxycodone) illegitimately. The US Drug Enforcement Administration reported that it is one of the most abused prescription drugs. Another narcotic, hydrocodone also has a high potential for abuse. Hydrocodone, as a narcotic cough medicine, is one of the favorite drugs sought by recreational users when they visit emergency departments. Both drugs act on the opioid mu receptor which blocks the transmission of pain in the spinal cord.
In the USA OxyContin is a $1.5 billion per year product. A report in the New York times from rural Kentucky ( July 2004) provides a perspective on narcotic drug use: “Ever since prescription painkillers like OxyContin became the drugs of choice among dealers and addicts in Appalachia, the days of small-town pharmacists' dispensing medicines from behind an ordinary counter have become a quaint memory. Now many pharmacies have turned into virtual fortresses. Some have bars over the windows. The most sought-after drugs are stored in vaults. The pharmacists often work behind safety glass, and some have even armed themselves. Surveillance cameras and alarm systems monitor every spot. Dan Smoot, chief detective for Operation Unite, an anti-drug task force said that prescription drugs remained the top problem for police agencies in the mountains. Mr. Smoot recently led the largest drug raid in Kentucky history, arresting over 200 people on charges of buying or selling prescription drugs on the black market.” 

The muscle relaxer, carisoprodol (Soma) is another favorite street drug which contains a metabolite of meprobamate, an old tranquilizer. Taken with alcohol, Soma produces stupor or "Soma coma." Tramadol (Ultram) is a pain medication that can produce a mild euphoric state. Dextromethorphan is a cough suppressant found in many cough syrups, which produces a euphoric state when taken in large quantities and can produce visual hallucinations.    People who take opioid analgesics for many days will develop physical dependence and will suffer withdrawal effects if the drug is discontinued suddenly. Symptoms of withdrawal include drug cravings, muscle cramps, joint pains, anxiety, nausea and vomiting. Withdrawal is most intense following IV heroin use and is relatively milder after taking oral medications.

Fentanyl has become the most potent narcotic with the greatest danger in the form of sudden death. Gatehouse and Nancy reported on the tragic rise in Fentanyl deaths in Canada. They described:" Over the past few months, fentanyl has been making headlines across North America, as police discover more and more of it on the streets, and overdose deaths surge. Authorities in Alberta linked the drug to 120 fatalities in 2014, and 50 more in just the first two months of this year. In British Columbia, it killed almost 80 people in 2014, and was responsible for a quarter of all drug deaths, up from just five per cent in 2012. In Ontario, where 625 people died of opioid overdoses in 2013, fentanyl was involved in 133 of those cases and, each year, it now kills twice as many people as heroin. First developed by pharmaceutical trailblazer Paul Janssen in 1959, it was originally used as an anaesthetic under the brand name Sublimaze. The slow-release transdermal patches for chronic pain relief were introduced in the mid-1990s. Its dangers have also long been recognized. There have been a number of scholarly studies about all the doctors and nurses, especially anaesthesiologists, who have become addicted to it, and notable victims such as Jay Bennett, the late guitarist for Wilco, who died of an accidental fentanyl overdose in 2009 after being prescribed the patch for an old hip injury. And the drug’s illicit analogues—there are at least a dozen variations—have been killing people on the streets since the late 1970s, most infamously under the name “China White.”
The deeper story of the drug and its abuse is even more worrying. Police and health workers now face an unprecedented situation, with a burgeoning street trade in both the legitimate prescription patches and illicitly manufactured fentanyl—often sold in pill form and made to look like OxyContin, a far less powerful narcotic. The drug, also available in liquid and powder form, is increasingly being used to cut cocaine and heroin, dramatically boosting their potency, often with fatal consequences. Indeed, fentanyl seems to turning up almost everywhere you look. And it’s killing both inexperienced newbies and hardened addicts. The illicit fentanyl that’s currently flooding Canadian markets in pill form has more benign nicknames: greenies, green beans and green monsters (all references to its emerald hue). But that doesn’t make it any less deadly. Stamped as OxyContin, the fentanyl has been retailing for as little as $10 a pill—an indication of how cheap it is to manufacture, and how easy it is to obtain the raw material.
The big B.C. investigation in March turned up two industrial pill presses that were used to make the 29,000 tablets. Two of the 14 people arrested in associated raids in Alberta and Saskatchewan are “full-patch” members of the Hells Angels. A third man is the president of an affiliated motorcycle gang, the Fallen Saints.
Then there’s the other problem: the growing abuse of the legitimate pharmaceutical version of the drug. Prescriptions for high-dose painkillers have skyrocketed over the last 15 years. A study by a group of Ontario researchers, published last fall in Canadian Family Physician,  determined that Canadians are now the world’s biggest per capita consumers of legal opioids, with more than 30 million high-dose tablets and patches distributed every year. Such widespread availability of opioids inevitably leads to widespread abuse. A recent meta-analysis by an American Scientist, published in the journal Pain, found that the average rate of misuse of prescribed painkillers is around 25 per cent  and that one in 10 medical users ends up addicted. In recent years, it was OxyContin that was driving that trend, because it could easily be crushed and snorted. But, once governments forced the manufacturer to introduce a tamper-resistant formulation, called OxyNeo, to the Canadian market in early 2012, the preferred high quickly became fentanyl.
Dr. Karen Woodall, a toxicologist with the Ontario Centre of Forensic Sciences in Toronto, regularly testifies as an expert in fentanyl cases. She first noticed the drug in 2005 in the autopsy files that cross her desk. She later traced deaths as far back as 2002, mostly via people overdosing after chewing cut-up bits of patches—a particularly dangerous practice, since there’s no way to predict the quantity of the drug in each piece. “The big problem with fentanyl is that a lot of people who aren’t tolerant to the drug are taking it. And if you’re not tolerant, it’s a lot more likely to cause serious toxicity and even death,” she says. “It severely depresses breathing and the heart rate. Combined with alcohol or other drugs that slow the central nervous system, it becomes even more dangerous. It’s a serious issue, we’re seeing more and more deaths.”  

From The Human Brain by Stephen Gislason MD


Sunday, July 05, 2015


The study of immunology has revealed a complexity of immune cell types and prolific interactions that overwhelm even the experts. The emerging description of chemical signaling that occurs among immune cells and between immune cells and all other tissues of the body has become especially complicated. As the collected data become denser, even highly specialized researchers have difficulty visualizing what is actually occurring in a diseased body.

The MD examining a patient, using conventional medical tools, is hopelessly inadequate and does not understand what is really going on. Classifications and names have changed with advancing discoveries. There more than 30 members of the interleukin family, for example, subdivided into families. To make a complex matter simple, they can be sorted into pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory groups.

Cell Signals

Cytokines are soluble proteins that regulate immune responses. One idea is that cytokines are short range signals. For example, it was though that production in lymphoid tissues is tightly localized and signaling occurs between conjugate cells. Perona-Wright et al assessed cytokine signaling during infection by measuring in vivo phosphorylation of intracellular signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins. They stated: We show that interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin 4 (IL-4) signaled to the majority of lymphocytes throughout the reactive lymph node and that IL-4 conditioning of naive, bystander cells was sufficient to override opposing T helper type 1 (TH1) polarization. Our results demonstrate that despite localized production, cytokines can permeate a lymph node and modify the majority of cells therein. Cytokine conditioning of bystander cells could provide a mechanism by which chronic worm infections subvert the host response to subsequent infections or vaccination attempts.

 Another idea is that cytokines provide long-range signalling and help to organize systemic responses to infection and injury. The nature series of scientific journals sponsors a data base that by 2006 listed over 3700 signaling proteins that carry messages among cells of the body. Dove described the state of signalling science: “Ask a cell biologist to explain signal transduction, and you are in for a long story. The science of understanding how individual cells sense their environments and respond to stimuli fills library shelves, occupies whole departments of colleges and inspires the careers of thousands of researchers around the world. Even so, the field sometimes seems woefully understaffed.

The advent of whole-genome sequencing and gene-expression profiling revealed what most biologists already suspected: we are just beginning to understand cell signaling. For example, cells rely heavily on surface receptor proteins to communicate with the outside world. Often, signals flows through receptors that are coupled to effector molecules called G proteins. Inside the cell, information flow often entails an enzyme finding a specific target protein and attaching or removing phosphates, lipid groups, or other chemical structures. The modified target commonly goes on to modify other targets and so on through baroque cascades of interactions.”

Scientists have described a bewildering complexity of cytokines and variable cytokine production in different humans. We know that humans are not created equal. One significant inequality lies in the ability to produce cytokines of different types. An individual’s cytokine profile will help to determine the response to antigen challenges, susceptibility to different diseases and the severity of the disease, once contracted. Advances in techniques of identifying ever larger numbers of signaling molecules have produced research papers dense with measurement data, often in a curious limbo, where the ephemeral dynamics of cell interactions are scarcely mentioned and not at all understood.

From Immunology Notes by Stephen Gislason MD

Sunday, March 29, 2015

Medical Students, Physicians, Bullying

The difficulties facing medical students and physicians are diverse and persistent. There is no escape from basic human tendencies. The competitive, critical disputatious nature of humans is amplified in medical institutions, despite a superficial appeal to collegiality. Physicians often face moral dilemmas and must cope with the least pleasant aspects of the human experience, often with little or no support from colleagues.

As most medical care becomes concentrated in large, impersonal institutions, a sense of alienation prevails. A pamphlet from the Canadian Medical Association for physicians talks about the “impact of stress on physician health and well being.” Canadian physicians are generally unhappy about the increasing demands on their time and energy while resources and rewards are shrinking. In Canada, physicians work in a government under-funded system that survives on budget cuts and rationing services.

The CMA pamphlet begins with a fuzzy statement that could win a prize in the annals of obfuscation: “Stress is part of everyone’s life. A certain level of stress contributes to optimal performance. However, when it is not managed properly, stress can become overwhelming, leading to physical, mental and spiritual difficulties.”

 I acknowledge that some readers would be more receptive to this kind of talk than I am. However, I would want them to ask what is really going on here? Physicians get tired, discouraged, frustrated and become angry like all other humans. Physicians tend to be more tolerant and giving than most other humans, but each person has limited understanding and limited resources. When demand exceeds supply, physicians, like other people, get discouraged, tired and angry. They may feel and act badly in a variety of ways. If we really want to understand the plight of physicians, the first step would be to pledge never to use the word “stress” just as we have pledged never to use the word “psychological” or the word “spiritual.” These are nonsense words that obscure what is really going on.

Dr. Pamela L. Wible wrote about physicians' bullying medical students and each other. Increasing concerns about physician burnout and suicide have surfaced in the US. Medical students suffer bullying and some end their lives. Wiebe stated: "The truth is, doctors are suffering. Surrounded by sickness and death, we watch families wail, shriek, cry while we stand silently—sacred witness to their sorrow—until we're called to the next room for a heart attack, a gunshot wound, a stillborn. Week by week. Year by year. And when do we grieve? Never. Doctors are not allowed to grieve. Today a physician tells me she's been cited for unprofessional conduct. Why? She was seen crying. Her boss told her, "Unless you are dying, crying is unprofessional behavior and not to be tolerated." Doctors are not allowed to cry. So, what do we do with our sadness? We injure ourselves—and each other. When I speak to victims of physician bullying, I explain, "Your instructors are suffering from unprocessed grief—probably victims of bullying themselves. Medicine is an apprenticeship profession. Trained by wounded doctors, they're now wounding you. Your bright eyes, your enthusiasm, your idealism remind them of their loss. Rather than feel their own grief, they lash out at you." (Pamela L. Wible. Physician Bullying: 'Not Allowed to Cry'. Medscape. Feb 20, 2015.)

There are few physicians who would not respond well to expressions of gratitude, respect and tender loving care. Each one needs more time off and an assistant or two to do all the extra chores demanded of them. Physicians spend much of their time caring for others but seldom receive care themselves. The increasing tendency for hospital and government administrators is to treat physicians with disrespect and to blame them for the high cost of medical care. Physicians confront injury, disease, cruelty, ignorance and anger most days and often miss opportunities to celebrate the joyful, creative aspects of life. A basic imbalance for any human is receiving less than he or she is giving. Physicians become overtired, do not eat well or regularly and often fail to enjoy friendly and affectionate leisure time with family and friends…. our description can go on and on. The more we observe specific details of physicians lives (never using the term “stress”) the more we understand how these humans suffer, make mistakes, become dysfunctional and ill or, if they are smart, take a long vacation or quit medicine before they collapse from frustration, disillusionment and fatigue.

See Medical Care Perspectives

Monday, March 02, 2015

Drinking Alcoholic Beverages

The Problem is drinking too much of the wrong drinks

The Solution : Stop Drinking Alcoholic Beverages

Humans like to become intoxicated. Fermented, liquid foods that contain alcohol are used worldwide in parties, celebrations and rituals. It is common for fermented foods to be included in the daily diet. Small doses of fermented foods relax inhibitions and can feel pleasant in social situations. Larger doses are toxic to the brain and disable the drinker.  The regular abuse of alcoholic beverages is called "alcoholism. The stigma  attached to the term "alcoholism" remains an obstacle to understanding this common problem.

There is a tendency to deny or to "normalize" excessive drinking. The use of alcoholic beverages is woven into the fabric of society and excessive use of alcohol is often considered "normal"  Regular ingestion of alcoholic beverage in excess produces many disease patterns involving every part of the body. Even “moderate” alcohol abuse distorts the personality, emotions and intellect of the "social drinker." The cognitive impairments and personality distortion are a direct consequence of brain dysfunction cause by ethanol and other chemical pathogens in alcoholic beverages.  Alcohol abuse is considered to be an addiction and some argue about calling alcoholism a “disease.” The term “addiction” refers both the compulsive aspect of drinking and also to the harm drinking causes. The drinker harms himself, his family and the community at large. A reasonable person will notice the harm he or she is causing and will seek to remedy the problem. An addict ignores the harm and remains devoted to ingesting alcoholic beverages no matter how much harm is caused.

Intoxication with alcoholic beverages generates behaviors that are regrettable and often destructive. Drunk people do much harm to themselves and others. The main drug effect is exerted by ethanol on the brain. As blood levels of ethanol increase, more and more brain functions are shut-down, rendering the intoxicant temporarily demented, with inappropriate behavior, incoordination and poor judgment. Alcohol intoxication routinely promotes fighting, assaults and death by accident or murder.

Dr. Gislason states in his preface to the book, Alcohol Problems and Solutions:

"I have learned that humans generally do things that they should stop doing. In addition, I have learned that reasonable, rational solutions to human problems are seldom pursued for very long. Alcohol abuse is one of the common human aberrations that has an easy, rational solution --- stop drinking. But drinkers routinely avoid the easy, rational path to health and happiness and instead pursue a self-destructive course that causes much harm and great human misery. This is a curious feature of the human mind that requires explanation.

Dr. Sidney Cohen, a drug abuse expert, described alcohol as "the most dangerous drug on earth." There are a variety of drinking patterns and the range of injury among alcohol abusers is great. Some are mildly injured and can recover on their own with the right tools and techniques. Others are critically injured, need hospitalization and prolonged rehabilitation with custodian supervision.  The challenge to a heavy drinker is not just to stop drinking for a while, but to stop forever.

Alcoholism is a complex and diverse problem. My book attempts to understand the problem of alcoholism and points to a comprehensive solution that requires alcohol abstinence and diet revision along with moral and mental resolve to restore a sane, sensible way of living. "

From the Book "Alcohol Problems and Solutions by Stephen Gislason MD

Monday, January 05, 2015

Diabetes Care - Self Management

The tasks involved in self-management are relatively easy, once you have learned how to do it. There is more and more help available as the concern about increasing prevalence and cost of DB2 increases. The American Diabetes Association published revised Standards of Care for diabetes, emphasizing that high-quality diabetes care must be individualized to reflect the needs, interests, and abilities of each patient. The primary goal is to reduce blood glucose levels to normal. You self-monitor blood glucose levels at home and have HbA1c monitored very 3 months. The secondary goal is to monitor for and, if detected, promptly treat any developing complications.

Reducing caloric intake is a key to success

If you follow common arguments about diabetic diets, then all diabetics should eat a low carbohydrate, low fat, low protein diet. The only way you can achieve all three goals is to eat a low food diet. Indeed reducing caloric intake is the key to success. Another key to success is to increase your energy expenditure by leading a more active life.

The Alpha Nutrition Program is a standard method of diet revision that proceeds in a simple, logical manner. You eat more vegetables, less fat and balance your new diet according to the best nutritional ideas. The program leaves out foods and food products that are higher risk and includes foods that have protective and beneficial effects.

The Alpha Nutrition approach includes Alpha DMX a specially designed elemental nutrient formula. We invented Alpha DMX to solve the problem of nutrient deficiency when you reduce your caloric intake. With 25 grams of Alpha DMX per day, your nutrient intake reaches recommended daily intakes goals for all vitamins and minerals even if you eat no food.

The Cardinal Rules of DB2

Eat less, exercise more.

You adjust the food you eat and your activity level to bring glucose utilization into balance with intake.

You monitor blood glucose frequently at first until you understand what different foods do in your body.

You use exercise to lower blood glucose if the levels go too high.

If your blood glucose is too high, you can skip meals, take Alpha DMX twice a day and snack on low calorie foods such as celery, lettuce, apples and carrot sticks.

The basic problem with proposing diet revision, as therapy is that eating behaviors are deeply rooted in a psychosocial matrix and are not rationally determined. Diabetic food management requires rational determination of eating behaviors and food selection. The social basis of eating patterns often conflicts with individual needs and opposes the attempts made by an individual to modify diet as a means of restoring or maintaining health.

The idea of "a diabetic diet" as a fixed set of instructions and a restricted food list is stubborn and fits with a passive-dependent attitude - "fix me" A new attitude of approach to diet revision is required especially when you have a chronic illness. The new attitude is based on self-responsible, self-monitored and self-directed change. The Alpha Nutrition Program assumes that you are in charge and you make your own decisions. The professional role is to support your effort to self-manage and assist you in trouble-shooting when symptoms recur or when irrational eating behavior is dominant and you need help complying with the healthy path.

Diabetes Center at Alpha Online

Order Managing Diabetes

Diet Revision Improves Diabetes, a Food Disease.

People with diabetes 2 have a food-disease. They have the task of changing their food choices and managing their diet carefully. This is a difficult task. We develop a perspective on diabetic management and reveal issues that are not well understood. We will suggest intelligent strategies for self-management of diabetes 2. Renewed concerns about the safety of popular drugs that lower blood sugar should focus attention on non-drug strategies.

Understanding diabetes has become more difficult as more is learned. In all biology, increasing complexity is revealed by ongoing research. Since glucose is the principle source of energy for all life, complex systems of glucose regulation have evolved. Eating behavior is steered towards high sugar foods that, once eaten, require prompt metabolic responses to utilize and store glucose for later use. Diabetes 2 involves a complex of disorders that start with appetite dysregulation and continue through disordered metabolism of glucose, cholesterol and fatty acids. Diabetes 2 is a progressive disorder. Early corrective action is highly desirable.

The Supreme Importance of Diet Revision

When you are diagnosed with diabetes 2, do not try to hold on to old habits. They made you ill. You have to change your food choices. You need to lose weight and exercise; 20 minutes per day of walking and resistance exercises that makes muscles work will correct many metabolic abnormalities, reducing the risk and the negative consequences of diabetes.

Standard medical treatment protocols for Diabetes 2 always mention diet revision and then quickly proceed to drug options. While food control is always mentioned, the critical, decisive importance of diet revision and exercise is not emphasized. Diet revision is neglected in favor of drug treatments. Diet revision means changing your food choices and learning how to self regulate by adjusting food choices and food amounts.

The odd reasoning in medical practice is that even though eating the wrong food contributed to or even caused the disease, you can just go to the store and buy a drug that will excuse you from changing the cause. Although some of the chemicals for sale at the pharmacy may reduce some consequences of eating too much of the wrong food, a smart person will get busy and remove the cause of the disease.

If you follow common arguments about diabetic diets, then all diabetics should eat a low carbohydrate, low fat, low protein diet. The only way you can achieve all three goals is to eat a low food diet. Indeed, reducing caloric intake is the key to success. Another key to success is to increase your energy expenditure by enjoying a more active life. When you exercise more, your muscles grown in size and strength and become more metabolically active. No drug can compete with beneficial changes in metabolism that exercise creates. Exercise acts on all the key metabolic organs and all the signaling molecules that control metabolism.

A diabetic treatment plan in its simplest form:
  • Diet Revision: Follow the Alpha Nutrition Program
  • Reduce total caloric intake
  • Alpha DMX 12 grams, 2 times per day
  • Exercise everyday

  • See Managing Diabetes, a book by Stephen Gislason MD

    Monday, December 22, 2014


    The term "depression" is descriptive and vague. I believe the whole concept of depression is flawed and needs to be revised. "Depression” does not point to one discrete disorder but to a variety of unpleasant experiences common to all humans. When the term “depression” is used without qualification, it is usually misleading. Since antidepressant drugs have become a big business, the promotion of "depression" as an illness, treatable with drugs has become a scandalous enterprise with little or no merit.

    Although the term “depression” was an invention of psychiatry the use of the term is pervasive in medicine, the media and in folk psychology. Writers, TV journalist and MD’s alike have been talking about “clinical depression” as if the word “clinical” increased the credibility of this dubious term. The best use of the term “depression’ is to point to someone who is unusually sad, critical and angry; a person who does not enjoy life and withdraws from work, play and close relationships with other humans.

    Suppression and Oppression

    All humans are involved in competition and negotiation with other humans. If you are losing a competitive struggle, you feel, sad and angry, sometimes with a terrible sense of loss; you want to withdraw, hide, cry and sometimes you want to die. If you habitually lose competitions or have an effective oppressor close by, you feel dysphoric often or always. We call this social inhibition, oppression or suppression rather than depression.

    The symptoms are features of a withdrawal-inhibition-supplication response that occurs normally in social mammals to reduce the consequences of power struggles for dominance in a social hierarchy. Subordinate individuals in any primate group are more or less “depressed.” They have to withdraw when challenged by superior animals, supplicate and inhibit their self-serving, aggressive inclinations. All humans experience episodes of withdrawal with inhibition and supplication if someone threatens or is mean or if privileges, property or prestige are lost. Whole groups of humans experience collective depression when the group is threatened or diminished in some way. Suicide is equated with depression, but self-inflicted death is a deep and troubling human behavior that cannot be explained away as an illness. Self-inflicted death may follow loss of prestige and property and is associated either with giving up hope of desired rewards, or anger at the inequities and injustices of the “system”.

    A reasonable person will acknowledge that life is difficult and suffering is inevitable. Everything we value is impermanent. Every feature of each of us is in flux and we change continuously. We age. We become ill. We suffer injury and loss. No human knows what comes next so that uncertainty is a constant companion. Modern life in cities is not normal for humans who emerged from living in small groups in natural environments and whose basic tendencies want to continue in that style of living, but cannot.

    Psychiatrist, Clements observes that normal feelings and the inevitable sadness of life are often denied and turned into a disease that can be treated with expensive chemicals. She stated: “Sorrow is not recognized as part of the human condition and reactive sadness is viewed as a medical illness, a pathology rather than a normal and very human response… I confess I cry for humanity, and another person's tears tend to generate tears in my eyes too. If sorrow can be avoided, well and good. But the reality is sorrow is an integral part of the complicated system of the cosmos, and of human existence.
    Depression, a vague label, what is the correct diagnosis ? Depression as a medical diagnosis is equated with “mood disorder’ and as a problem located inside one individual. Much of the content that is included under the term “depression” has little or nothing to do with mood and involves changes in body function, cognitive dysfunction and changes in specific behaviors. The main textbook features of “depression” are withdrawal from and loss the loss of interest in job, family, social activities and personal hobbies. "Depressed thinking" is said to be pessimistic, critical of others and oneself and tends toward guilty ruminations and suicidal thoughts.

    Research into the neurobiology of “depression’ has produced a bewildering display of abnormalities, not because depression is a real illness with a lot of abnormal findings, but because people gathered together under this diagnosis are a heterogeneous group with many contributing disorders. Some are just sad, lonely people with poor diets, poor living conditions, family conflict, no fun and no exercise.

    It should be obvious that some people are happier than others and some people live under a cloud of doom.  The reader needs to recall our basic understanding of genetics. The idea is that all human characteristics are distributed and, no matter what human feature you are considering, you will find some individuals with more and some with less. When you accumulate sufficient data and do the appropriate statistics, you will have an idea about the distribution of the feature and an indirect understanding of the genetic and environmental determinants of that feature. When researchers reported that variations in a gene they were studying more or less correlated with the tendency to become depressed, the media ran cover page stories linking the gene to “stress” to depression and promising new tests and treatments.

    Helen Person in her review of the study stated: “The gene, which encodes a protein called 5-HTT, reveals its influence when people experience divorce, debt, unemployment or other occasions of "threat, loss, humiliation or defeat. People carrying two short forms of the 5-HTT gene had a 43% chance of becoming clinically depressed after four or more stressful events experienced between the ages of 21 and 26. This compares with 17% of those with two long ones…  The new results also raise the prospect of genetic tests to predict those who are vulnerable to depression. But this remains unlikely, partly because there is no clear preventative therapy for those at risk.  Such a test would also be unreliable. Of the two-thirds of the general population with one or two short stress-sensitive genes, only a fraction becomes depressed. Many other genes and experiences, such as physical illness, are involved. These must be identified before an accurate risk assessment can be made.”

    Depression Solution

    Many of the symptoms included under the title of “depression” are typical of common food-related diseases including diabetes, atherosclerosis, malnutrition, hormonal dysfunction and delayed pattern food allergy. All these problems require diet revision. We suggest that a prudent person suffering depression and body symptoms would be wise to pursue vigorous, thorough diet revision at the earliest opportunity. Because some brain dysfunction compromises judgment learning and motivation, family members, friends and professional advisors often have to provide the right direction and support.

    From the Human Brain by Stephen Gislason MD

    Gluten and the Brain, Protein Diseases

    Celiac disease is the best studied form of delayed pattern food allergy caused by eating wheat and other cereal grains. A surprising range of disease is triggered by the proteins in these foods, collectively referred to as gluten. Celiac disease may present as a vague illness, even a mental illness.

    Patients often complain of dysphoria with fatigue, difficulty in concentration, loss of recent memory, irritability, loss of pleasure and interests, often with sleep disturbances. Sleep and dreaming are influenced by food problems. Most people eat their major meal in the evening and snack at night. This food is digested and absorbed during the night and symptoms often emerge as you sleep. Some allergenic effects tend to peak at night - asthma, migraine, body pains, and itching are often at their worst. Sleep disturbances include difficulty falling asleep, frequent waking and nightmares.

    Luostarinen et al suggested: It is well known that coeliac disease may be associated with various neurological manifestations. We have had a high index of suspicion of coeliac disease during recent years in our neurological clinic. As a result 10 (7%) out of 144 of our new coeliac patients were detected because of neurological symptoms. The most common neurological manifestations were neuropathy, memory impairment and cerebellar ataxia. In these patient groups screening for coeliac disease with serological antibody tests helps to find patients who may suffer from this disease.

    Wills suggested A number of neurological syndromes have been described in association with coeliac disease. These include disorders of the central nervous system encompassing epilepsy, myoclonus, ataxia, internuclear opthalmoplegia, multifocal leukoencephalopathy and dementia. Most of these associated conditions show a poor response to gluten restriction. Peripheral neuropathies, of axonal and demyelinating types, have also been reported and may respond to elimination of gluten from the diet. The mechanism underlying these processes remains obscure but may be immunological or related to trace vitamin deficiencies. Controversially, it has also been claimed that occult coeliac disease accounts for a substantial proportion of patients with neurological dysfunction of unknown cause. Some authorities recommend that cryptogenic ataxias and neuropathies should be routinely screened for the presence of gluten-sensitivity but this remains contentious and has not been universally accepted.

    Gluten and Cerebellar Ataxia

    One example of specific brain injury from eating gluten is cerebellar ataxia. The cerebellum looks after the coordination and smoothing of movements so that problems here show up as movement disorders. Gluten sensitivity, with or without classical celiac disease symptoms and intestinal pathology, is a treatable cause of cerebellar ataxia.

    Bushara et al reported: We investigated the prevalence of abnormally high serum immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgG anti-gliadin antibody titers and typical human lymphocyte antigen (HLA) genotypes in 50 patients presenting with cerebellar ataxia who were tested for molecularly characterized hereditary ataxias. A high prevalence of gluten sensitivity was found in patients with sporadic (7/26; 27%) and autosomal dominant (9/24; 37%) ataxias, including patients with known ataxia. Patients with hereditary ataxia (including asymptomatic patients with known ataxia genotype) should be considered for screening for gluten sensitivity and gluten-free diet trials.

    Hadjivassiliouet al reported that patients with gluten ataxia have antibodies against Purkinje cells. Antigliadin antibodies cross-react with epitopes on Purkinje cells. Burk et al reported the symptoms of gluten ataxia: The clinical syndrome was dominated by progressive cerebellar ataxia with ataxia of stance and gait (100%), dysarthria (100%) and limb ataxia (97%). Oculomotor abnormalities were gaze-evoked nystagmus (66.7%), spontaneous nystagmus (33.3%), saccade slowing (25%) and upward gaze palsy (16.7%). Extracerebellar features also included deep sensory loss (58.3%), bladder dysfunction (33.3%) and reduced ankle reflexes (33.3%).

    From The Human Brain by Stephen Gislason MD

    Wednesday, December 10, 2014

    Feeding Infants and Children

    Children are exposed to major health problems from their food supply. In affluent countries, the children's food supply tends to be the most processed and chemically contrived of any age group. Food manufacturers and vendors advertise their synthetic, processed foods directly to youngsters, and generally succeed in marketing their products. Boxed, canned, and bottled foods, fast foods, snack foods, candies, chocolate bars,  burgers, pizzas, and pop all form the food vocabulary of our adolescents and many of our younger children.
    Some problems, such as food-borne infection, insufficient food and malnutrition, are painfully obvious in third world countries but also occur closer to home because of poverty, ignorance, and neglect. Other food problems are less obvious and may not be recognized; these include major, pervasive biological disturbances from inappropriate food choices, food excesses, nutrient deficiencies, food allergy, and chemical toxicity from food additives and contaminants. Children of poor families with limited food choices are more obviously at risk of malnutrition but children of more affluent families may also suffer malnutrition in the form of wrong food choices, caloric excess, nutrient disproportion and even vitamin mineral deficiencies when packaged and processed food replaces real food.

    Problems with Common  Food Rules

    For years, official food rules suggest that children eat from the four food groups: milk, eggs, meat, and whole grain cereals as staple foods. Boxed cereal and milk is a common breakfast. The cereal has been nutritionally fortified, and so has the milk; nutrient intake may be satisfactory by nutrient accounting, but what about the impact of the food on the child as a whole?

    The Unique Child

    In theory, all children should be treated equally, but all children are not created equally. Nourishing food has to interact with each person’s unique metabolism and reactivity. Many things can go wrong. Abnormal food-body interactions change the rules of nutrition. A cheese sandwich may be nourishing to one child and a toxic mix for another. A chocolate bar with peanuts may please one child and send another to the hospital in an ambulance. Daily milk or bread ingestion may be suitable for one child and cause chronic disease in another.
    The premise of the Alpha Nutrition Program is that each child will have a best fit of safe, nourishing foods and nutrient supplements that permit a long and healthy life. Your best fit diet is likely to be different from other people’s best fit. Even close relatives will be different.

    Two parents with three children should have five different diets to suit the individual needs of each unique individual. The idea of a “normal diet” suitable for the whole family is flawed.  A better idea is that a small selection of best foods may serve the needs of the whole family, but beyond this “core diet” individual differences will become all important in the determination of who does well, who does poorly, and who develops a disease.

    Biologists understand that the distribution of observable characteristic follow the distribution of genes in an in any given population. A "normal distribution" of any measured characteristic is a bell-shaped curve, with most scores in the middle range and a few at each end, or "tail," of the distribution.
    The main idea is that all human characteristics are distributed and, no matter what human feature you are considering, you will find some individuals with more and some with less. When you accumulate sufficient data and do the appropriate statistics, you will have an idea about the distribution of the feature and an indirect understanding of the genetic and environmental determinants of that feature.

    Food Allergy is Common

    During the first year of life, the infant diet is the most powerful determinant of the growth and development of the child and food allergies are the most common health problem. Many studies show that breast feeding is best and that the feeding of solid foods is best delayed  4 to 6 months to reduce the risk of food allergy. Food allergy in infancy is expressed as crying, colic, vomiting, diarrhea, rashes, eczema and cold-like respiratory congestion. Some infants with food allergies become seriously ill and fail to thrive unless their allergy is recognized and corrected. Infants who develop a food allergy in their first year may "outgrow" the first effects but tend to grow into children with more pervasive health, behavior and learning problems unless their diet is properly managed.

    We have found that milk and wheat allergy are common in children of all ages, Food allergy causes physical symptoms and also contributes to learning and behavioral problems. A peanut butter and jam sandwich and a carton of milk is a common school lunch, followed by the most common afternoon symptoms - flushing, congestion, fatigue, irritability and the inability to concentrate. 
    There are many ways for food problems to interfere with a child's normal functioning and to promote disease. We  assume that several problems interact in a complex manner to produce the symptoms and dysfunction that we seek to remedy. It is always necessary, therefore, to correct nutritional problems by complete diet revision

     Using the Alpha Nutrition Program

    See Feeding Children by Stephen Gislason MD

    Tuesday, April 05, 2011

    Psychedelic Drugs

    Drugs that produced unusual experiences have been called “psychedelics” or “hallucinogens”. A hallucination is an experience originated within the brain that is similar to or indistinguishable from an experience originating from outside the brain. Deeply imbedded in the nature of consciousness is the ability of the brain to project an internal event into the world outside. Indeed, all events internal and external are brain events. If a person takes a known psychedelic agent, LSD, he or she expects to have unusual experience and will report these experiences appropriately as, for example, an “acid trip.”

    If a psychedelic chemical is produced in the brain or is present as an unknown entity in food or drinks, then the unusual experiences will be reported as real experiences, happening out there in the real world. One theory of "schizophrenia" is that internal psychedelics act on the brain to cause psychotic mind activity. Drugs used to treat this “illness” are supposed to counter the brain disturbance created by endogenous psychedelic chemicals.

    I am convinced that the diagnosis of schizophrenia may act against the best interests of teenagers, their parents and their community. Schizophrenia is a term that can be applied such a variety of brain dysfunctions, that the focus should be on discovering the root cause of the brain dysfunction and not this antiquated diagnosis. Drug use and abuse is so prevalent among teenagers that any brain dysfunction (aka mental illness) in an adolescent should be attributed to drug use until proven otherwise. If not drug use, then the cause may be eating too much of the wrong food and exercising too little.

    Psychedelic drug use flourished in the 60’s in the US and Canada, along with rock and roll, folk music and protests against racial discrimination and the Vietnam war. LSD was popular in the sixties with researchers who were excited about the therapeutic possibilities of a drug that “opened the doors of perception and the gates of heaven and hell.” For many, LSD was a deep and spiritual drug that appeared to be a key to understanding brain function. Research into the action of LSD in the brain revealed a profusion of activity that defied easy understanding, however. LSD research was outlawed and psychedelic use subsided in the 1970’s and 80’s only to increase again in the 1990’s.

    Cannabis (marihuana) is perhaps the most available and widely used psychoactive plant. It contains the psychoactive drug, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). In the best case, THC induces mild euphoria, feelings of general well-being, relaxation with increased appreciation of humor, music and food with increased sensuality and creative or philosophical thinking. In the worst case, disorientation, memory deficits, paranoia, agitation, and anxiety produce bad experiences and antisocial behaviors. Cannibis use can produce any and all the symptoms of psychiatric illness. Combine cannabis with other drugs, malnutrition and punk rock, you can reproduce  many of the mental illnesses in the psychiatric textbook.

    Other natural psychedelics include  psilocybin (magic mushrooms), mescaline (peyote), LSA (Morning Glory Seeds) and Ayahuasca found in teas brewed from plants containing dimethyltryptamine and harmine. Synthetics such as MDMA (ecstasy), 2C-B (nexus), DOM (STP), and 5-MeO-DIPT (Foxy Methoxy) are common street drugs. LSD and psilocybin are based on tryptamine. Mescaline and 2C-B. are based on phenethylamine. Psychedelic effects include sensory distortions, such as the warping of surfaces. 2C-B produces dose sensitive effects: a small dose increase is the difference between no activity and a disconnection from “reality”. Empathogens are phenethylamines such as MDMA and MDE that induce feelings of openness, euphoria, empathy, love, and heightened self-awareness. MDA (unlike MDMA) is neurotoxic.

    Alkaloids of the ergoline family produce a variety of compounds that can be psychoactive or have medicinal value. Ergine was discovered by Albert Hofmann working at Sandoz laboratories where ergot alkaloids became big business. Hofmann administered new compounds to himself to assay psychoactive effects. A 500 microgram dose by injection led to a tired, dreamy state, with an inability to maintain clarity of consciousness. After a short period of sleep these effects ended. Ergine is a precursor to LSD, and is listed DEA schedule III drug in the United States. Hoffman was the first to synthesize LSD and appreciate its psychedelic effects. Many drugs have been derived from ergot alkaloids such as Bromocriptine, Cabergoline, Ergine, Ergonovine, Ergotamine; Lysergic acid, Lysergol, LSD, D-Lysergic acid hydroxyethylamide, Lisuride, Methergine, Methysergide, Pergolide.

    From Children and the Family by Stephen Gislason MD

    Thursday, March 10, 2011

    Medical Thinking

    Medicine has become an eclectic assortment of activities, loosely connected to a variety of scientific disciplines. While MDs study science, they are not usually scientists. They are technicians with a special mandate to care for other humans who are sick and injured. A short time ago, physicians were conspicuous members of communities with well defined social status and social responsibilities that were often more important than their technical abilities. The community recognized the limitations of its physician and accepted caring and concern in place of therapeutic efficacy. Physicians continued the traditions of shamans, performing in front of audiences who needed their reassurance or who shared their grief.

    As human populations grew, societies became multilayered complexes of interacting groups and technologies. Universities and medical societies clung to the old ideas of the community physician while teaching medical students an odd assortment of technologies, hoping that somehow these bright people would figure out how to retain their humanity while they practiced increasingly abstract and impersonal techniques. Hospitals collected machines for diagnosis and treatment and hospital communities involved increasingly diverse groups of people who interacted in increasingly complex ways. Specialized physicians stayed in the hospital where high technology equipment and teams of technicians were available.

    Many complications have arisen in recent years in the application of increasingly expensive technologies. Both physicians and patients complain that they have become disenfranchised and alienated. The media features medical news everyday, creating a feeding frenzy for good news --- everyone wants to believe claims that a common disease is about to be cured. Although progress in basic science is marvelous, progress in medical treatments is slow and often disappointing. Media claims tend to misleading, creating inflated expectations and stampedes towards cures that are more fantasy that reality or are frankly fraudulent.

    Medical practice is now under scrutiny from many directions. The idea of practice guidelines and problem-solving algorithms have been around for many years, but now are the subject of heated debate. Many scholars have realized that research findings do not get incorporated into medical practice - indeed with the proliferation of information, there is less formal direction in the selection and application of knowledge. Practice guidelines are now so numerous that a front-line physicians could not possibly follow them. Astute observers notice that medical practice goes with fads and fashions. The most important source of modern illness such as the negative effects eating too much of the wrong food and the toxicity of polluted environments are too complicated and are usually ignored in medical practice.

    There are different approaches to the study of medical practices. One approach is to examine how physicians think and react. In the best case, physicians are objective, rational problem solvers who follow standard algorithms to arrive at correct diagnoses and who prescribe the safest, least expensive, most efficacious treatments. In the worst case, physicians are prejudiced, irrational technicians who are unreliable problem solvers and often fail to make correct diagnoses and often prescribe treatments that are expensive, unsafe and fail to solve the problem at hand.

    You can argue that physicians are just like everyone else. They have likes and dislikes and limited ability to understand complex issues. Physicians can be as irrational as anyone else. For example, physicians often divide illness into two broad categories, the organic and the non-organic. The distinction is used universally by physicians when they talk to one another but there is no biology to support the irrational belief in "non-organic illness." In dismissing a patient’s symptoms, a physician will remark to a colleague, for example, that the origin of the abdominal pain is "supratentorial." This is a neuroanatomical remark without much understanding. The tentorium is a membrane that forms a floor for the cerebral hemispheres inside the skull. A supratentorial event would involve any part of the brain above the midbrain and for many physicians, brain function at this level is indeed a mystery.

    Physicians continue to rely on patient’s stories and medical students are still taught to take a history as an essential part of their examination of the patient. However, all story telling is imperfect; patients lie, both deliberately and inadvertently. Physicians tend to be impatient and biased listeners who want to hear a simplified story that fits their preconceptions of diagnostic categories. They often ignore the patient's report and invent their own story.

    Medicine is afflicted with descriptions, categories and generalizations that are confusing or misleading. The popular notions of cancer, for example, are misleading. Slogans such as "Cure for Cancer" are nonsensical. There is no disease called cancer, rather there are diverse expressions of cell growth gone wrong. Aberrant cells are created in everyone. Abnormal cells can occur in any tissue of the body - one at a time or in groups. The first tumor discovered is described as a local disease, but malignant cells enter the blood and are carried through the body. "Cancer" is a whole body, chronic disease. The incidence of mutated cells increases with age and increases as more carcinogens are introduced to the environment. Fortunately, most abnormal cells fail to grow. Some growth abnormalities are pre-programmed, but most are induced by carcinogens that are optional features of environments. Most often, carcinogens are man-made radiation or chemicals, distributed in the air, water and food. MDs add carcinogens to their patients' burden with XRays and chemotherapeutic drugs; attempts to kill one population of mutated cells, creates other populations of mutated cells and, at the same time, suppresses immune activity that might destroy the new mutations.

    Recently, stories about individuals and their unique experiences have been replaced by reports from studies of large anonymous groups whose fate is interpreted with statistics, as if these studies were better than understanding the experience of individuals. The results of studies are analyzed statistically which creates an abstract, virtual reality of doubtful value. I believe that medicine based on large "clinical studies" is flawed at fundamental level of wrong assumption, but evidence-based medicine is the new dogma of medical practice. Drug companies use studies as part of their marketing strategy; good results are released to the media and bad results are forgotten. The ideals of science and medical ethics are also forgotten. See Confusing Study Results
    You can argue that the education of physicians is flawed; modest attempts have been made to improve medical school teaching, but the same old stuff usually gets repeated with little or no review. Medical school tends to be a hectic tour through a variety of disciplines that contribute to the medical view of the word. Medical students are challenged to learn too much too quickly and have little time to reflect.

    Medical education has a friendly surface, that invites you to study anatomy, biochemistry, physiology, pharmacology and pathology, all noble disciplines that reveal life processes in health and disease. There is also a somewhat hidden curriculum that transforms smart and free individuals into obedient servants of the system. Conformity is the highest value in medicine and some students have trouble adjusting to their new status as obedient robots. The system includes many wealthy and powerful players who have little or no tolerance for idealist students who want to innovate and change the way the system works. Wealth means vested interest which translates into a desire to control medical school curricula, post-grad medical education and government policies.

    New insights into human interactions, the environment and better understanding of the actual and real causes of disease might in the future transform medical education. Universities will have to re-examine their assumptions and methods. Strategies that involve disease prevention and interventions at early stages of disease should take precedence over futile attempts to fix end-stage disease.

    In a New Times editorial, physician Zuger described a number of books written by other physicians. She identified Dr. Jerome Groopman and Dr. Atul Gawande, both clinicians at Harvard and writers for The New Yorker as articulate commentators on the state of medical practice. Zuger stated: "Instead of speeding along in double time, Groopman and Gawande, like the frustrated coaches of a losing team, are slowing the motion of medicine down to half-speed, examining each play, then each frame and image, trying to figure out where the glitches lie."

    Groopman describes errors and uncertainty in medical care. Groopman said he wrote his book from dissatisfaction that is common among physicians. He analyses errors in assumptions and reasoning. MDs, like all humans, jump to conclusions quickly and then seek evidence that supports their first impressions. They tend to be dogmatic and resist change. Physicians are encouraged to think in terms of categories and link diagnoses with prescriptions. MDs should understand pathophysiology and think in terms of disease-causing processes that act over time. They should always want to know what causes the process and how to intervene in the early stages of disease to prevent progression.

    Groopman describes some of his own experiences with other Doctors: "One of my first experiences with the problem came in 1983, during the first week in July as it happens, when my wife, Pam, also a doctor, and I were traveling to Boston from California with our son Steven, then 9 months old. Steve had developed a low-grade fever, had dark and loose stools and was irritable, refusing to nurse. Stopping in Connecticut to visit my in-laws, we consulted the town pediatrician. The doctor quickly dismissed Pam’s concerns. “You’re overanxious,” he told her. “Doctor-parents are like this.” By the time we arrived in Boston, the baby was ashen and he was jerking his knees to his chest and wailing in pain. We rushed to the emergency room at Children’s Hospital, where a new surgical resident examined him, ordered X-rays and blood tests and made the correct diagnosis: an intussusception, an intestinal obstruction. It was a hectic night, and the novice doctor was being pulled in many directions. He told us there was no urgency to operate and left us alone with our flailing child. I had worked one year in a research lab at this hospital and phoned the senior hematologist who had been my mentor. He contacted an attending surgeon, who came to the emergency room and whisked Steve to the operating room. “It was fortunate that we operated when we did,” the surgeon told us later. The intestine was at the point of bursting, spilling its contents into the abdomen, precipitating peritonitis and possibly shock."

    Zuger, A. Doctors Who Wield the Pen to Heal the Profession. NYT. May 15 2007.
    Groopman Mental Malpractice, NYT. July 7, 2007

    See Medical Care and Planet Ecology